?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Femslash February in myths, tales and religion - Part 3 - Les divagations de Nelja [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Les divagations de Nelja

[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

Femslash February in myths, tales and religion - Part 3 [Feb. 21st, 2018|10:35 am]
Les divagations de Nelja
[Tags|, , , , , ]





Gold-Tree (15/28)
Gold-Tree and Silver-Tree is my favorite version of the Snow White tale, and it ends in a m/f/f poly ship.
Silver-Tree is a queen who has a daughter, Gold-Tree. A magical trout tells her her daughter is now more beautiful than her, and she gets so jealous that she feigns an illness and tells her husband that only eating Gold-Tree’s heart could save her.
The king asks Gold-Tree to choose immediately among all the young princes who want to marry her. And when she’s gone to her husband’s castle, he kills some animal, gives him to eat to Silver-Tree, and tells her it’s Gold-Tree’s heart.
But Silver-Tree learns that she lives again, through the trout. She then pretexts repentance to see her daughter again, and poisons her with a thorn.
The Prince is incredibly sad, and keeps his wife’s body (that doesn’t decompose) in a secret chamber. But as he had no heirs with Gold-Tree, he must marry again. The second wife is first overjoyed, then she discovers that he’s always sad. She investigates, finds a room with the most beautiful woman in the world, finds and removed the poisoned thorn.
The prince is very happy, and the second wife was to go back to her parents, but Gold-Tree and the prince want her to stay, so it ends in happy polyamory (and when Silver-Tree tries to poison Gold-Tree again, the second wife manipulates her so she poisons herself instead)







Candi (16/28)
Chandra is a (male) hindu god of the moon, of life, of happiness, and fertility. He’s married to 27 sisters.
He’s eaten as the moon wanes, giving his lifeforce to every being on earth, and is replaced by his female counterpart Candi. Candi too will be eaten a month later, and Chandra will return. Candi is still married to the 27 sisters. Religious representations of lesbian relationships between them are really rare, but still exist.







Camilla (17/28)
Camilla, in the Eneid, was a warrior woman. When she was a baby, her deposed father had to flee with her, and throw her attached to a lance. As Diana protected the baby, he consecrated her to the goddess, and Camilla became a virgin badass. She’s an adversary of the heroes, and is killed in battle but still an interesting character, treated with respect.
She fights with other warrior women, whom she has affectionate relations with, like Acca, who hears her last words, or Opis, who avenges her death. And you know, by the standards of the time, I’m pretty sure that “virgin” only meant “no sex with men”, so she can very easily be seen as a lesbian icon.







The woman who married her daughter-in-law (18/28)
In this Inuit tale, a man marries a very pretty girl. While he’s away for a long hunting, his mother builds a dildo with seal bone, and seduces his wife. She then starts to take the man’s role in the house, goes to hunt seals, etc.
When the son comes back, he’s very suspicious when he sees all the skin seals, he thinks her wife has a lover. He doesn’t tell her he’s back and spies on her. For a while, he’s reassured when he sees his mother coming home with dead seals, then is shocked again when he sees her asking for sex. He jumps in and kills his mother.
He proposes his wife to go live elsewhere, to forget, because this place is cursed now. But she can only cry and repeat “you killed my dear husband”.







Little Robber Girl (19/28)
We’re firmly in non-canon territory here. But in The Snow Queen, it’s so easy to read the actions of the Robber Girl towards Gerda as romantic attraction. Be it the initial cruel possessiveness, the freeing her out of respect with a lot of gifts, the way Gerda changed her life and gave her the courage to stand up for herself and leave her family, or her disparagement of Kay at the end.
She’s one of my favorite fairy tale characters and I hope she gets to be happy!







Amaterasu and Uzume (20/28)
Once the goddess of the Sun, Amaterasu, was so angry and sad because her brother Susanoo destroyed her fields and killed her servants, that she hid into a cave for a long time, and the sun didn’t shine.
To have her get out of the cave, the gods organized a party just in front of it. In some versions, they pretended to have found a new wonderful, shiny goddess, and out of curiosity, Amaterasu peered. But it was just a huge mirror, the one they worshipped was her. She was touched and stopped sulking.
But in other versions, it was Uzume, goddess of cheerfulness, and her erotic dancing, that made her want to look. And while she was slowly getting out the cave, the gods closed the entry, and she had to reintegrate them. Since then, Uzume is also “The Great Persuader”, and as she makes the sun come out, she is also the goddess of dawn.







Olive (21/28)
Olive ends up with Ide, who is a trans man. But as she already loved and supported Ide who still identified as a woman in men’s clothes, I read her as bisexual.
The story starts with Ide’s father wanting to marry her because she’s the only one who’s as beautiful as her dead mother. But instead of wearing a donkey skin, Ide steals men’s clothes and a horse, joins the army, and becomes so good that the king Othon wants this badass young man to marry her daughter Olive.
Ide accept, Olive is very happy about it, but for a long time they don’t sleep together. As Olive asks why, Ide tells her the truth, and Olive assures Ide that the secret is safe, she has no problem with it. But someone overheard them, and the king has a problem with it. He invites Ide to bathe with him, and he sure won’t forgive such an imposture. They pray a lot, and an angel appears and transforms Ide’s body into a man’s.



Cette entrée a été crosspostée au https://flo-nelja.dreamwidth.org/615387.html. Commentez où vous voulez.
linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: _profiterole_
2018-02-21 02:08 pm (UTC)
Toujours aussi intéressant ! Je me souviens du conte inuit, tu en avais déjà parlé sur LJ.
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: flo_nelja
2018-02-21 02:16 pm (UTC)
Oui ! J'ai dû déjà parler de beaucoup d'entre eux, en fait, mais en français et sans images :-)
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)